Monday, October 16, 2017

Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom

Are you looking for some high-interest books for your secondary Social Studies classroom?  Would you like to read to your classes?  Read this post about the books teachers recommend the most!


Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: A Long Walk to Water, Refugee, A Moment Comes, Number the Stars, Iqbal, Bamboo People, The Breadwinner, Red Scarf Girl, The Boy on the Wooden Box, My Brother Sam is Dead, Newsela



A Long Walk to Water

This book has very short chapters, sure to keep their interest and great for reading about ten minutes a day.  It's about two children living in Sudan and the long walks they take to get what they need to survive.


Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: A Long Walk to Water




Refugee

A newer edition, and another book that has multiple viewpoints telling the story.  This time, it's refugee children from Nazi Germany, Cuba, and Syria.  All are trying to find a safe home.


Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: Refugee




A Moment Comes 

Based on the Partition of India in 1947,  this book shows covers the event through three teens from very different backgrounds (Muslim, Sikh, and British). 


Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: A Moment Comes




Number the Stars

A great story about the kindness of families for the refugees of Nazi Germany.




Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: Number the Stars




Iqbal 

Iqbal is based on a true story about child labor in Pakistan.



Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: Iqbal





Bamboo People

Bamboo people is longer but it gets their attention because they are kidnapped and made into child soldiers in Burma.



Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: Bamboo People





The Bread Winner series by Debra Ellis

This series is about families coming together to take care of each other under Taliban rule.  The heroine of the story is Afghani girl, who must pretend to be a boy so she can work to make money for her family.



Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: The Breadwinner





This is set in 1966 Communist China, and how it impacted the life of young Ji-Li and her family as they try to survive under Mao Ze-dong's Cultural Revolution.



Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: Red Scarf Girl







The Boy on the Wooden Box: How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler's List 

This is a memoir by a child survivor of the Holocaust.  It details how the main character and his family were saved by Schindler's List.



Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: The Boy on the Wooden Box






My Brother Sam is Dead  

This is a story about a family divided by the Revolutionary War.


Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: My Brother Sam is Dead



Newsela Social Studies

For nonfiction leveled texts that you can either read aloud or have students read on their own.



Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom: Newsela





Be sure to come back next week for the second part of the series:  Read-Aloud Books for the Secondary Science Classroom!












Monday, October 9, 2017

How to Use Get-to-Know-You Activities Later in the Year

Don't throw away those get-to-know-you surveys you did on the first day of school!  This post gives you ideas for using that valuable information all through the school year. 

In a previous post, I talked about making Get-to-Know-You Nametags. The pictures below are the examples I use to show students how to make their own on the first day of school. 









Here are the ways I continue to use them:

1.  Have students keep them out on their desks for the first couple of weeks of school. It really helps me to memorize faces and names.  I just have the students keep the tags in their binders and put them back out on their desk each day. 


2.  Collect and alphabetize the tags after a couple of weeks. I hope-punch put them and put them in a binder. 








3. Refer to the nametags when you need to make a connection with a child.  If I have a difficult conversation with a student, such as poor grades or behavior, I make sure to look at their information afterwards. I make sure to find something we have in common and strike up a conversation with that information. 

For example, I used the fact that I also like watching The Office to make a connection with one of my students who I've been struggling with lately. 

What are some ways you use get-to-know-you activities later in the year?  I'd love some fresh Ideas!





Monday, October 2, 2017

No-Tech Ways to Teach and Assess Vocabulary in Core Subjects

Are you searching for meaningful ways to teach, review, and assess vocabulary in the core subjects?  Then I have what you're looking for in this post!

4-Square Vocabulary Template
I like to assign the Definition and Graphic part of the 4-square vocabulary for homework prior to the instruction of those concepts.  This front-loads the the information so students are reading to participate in class discussions.

Read more about how I use this technique by clicking here.

No-Tech Ways to Teach and Assess Vocabulary in Core Subjects: 4-Square Template




Review Games
After all the vocabulary has been thoroughly taught, we play review games from my Vocabulary Review Games Packet.


No-Tech Ways to Teach and Assess Vocabulary in Core Subjects: Review Games



No-Tech Ways to Teach and Assess Vocabulary in Core Subjects: Review Games


Other fun games to play with vocabulary:

Pictionary 


Vocabulary Bingo

No-Tech Ways to Teach and Assess Vocabulary in Core Subjects: Review Games




Find Someone Who:  
This technique uses a page with squares similar to bingo. In each square is a definition. The students walk around with each other and find someone who knows the right answer. That person writes the correct answer in the box with the definition and signs their name. Spend 5-10 minutes at the end for students to share the correct responses out loud.


Word Splash
Write a vocabulary word on the board and give students 10-60 seconds to write everything they can think of relating to that word.  At the end of the time, have students move to another student's paper and repeat the process with one exception:  They may not repeat write anything already written on the paper.



Vocabulary Assessments:
The template I use to assess vocabulary knowledge includes the following activities:

Fill-in-the-blank
Write the definition in your own words
Give an example/non-example
Use the word in a sentence

Read more about how I use vocabulary assessments in this post.

No-Tech Ways to Teach and Assess Vocabulary in Core Subjects: Assessment





I made a packet for the templates for the 4-square and vocabulary test. Click here to pick up a copy of my Vocabulary Instruction and Assessment Packet.


What do you use to teach, review, and assess vocabulary?  I'd love to hear your ideas!





Sunday, September 24, 2017

5-Minute Pencil-Management System

Are you tired of students coming to class without a pencil?  Do you loan out pencils and never get them back?  I have a quick and easy solution for you!

There's a saying that goes something like this:  "If a student needs a pencil, give him a pencil. There are better ways to teach him responsibility". I agree, but I also don't want to spend my entire paycheck on pencils that grow legs and walk away. 

So, allow me to show you my 5-Minute Pencil Management System!



5-Minute Pencil-Management System

I wrap the pencils in a unique duct tape to easily identify them and place them in a magnetic pencil holder. 



5-Minute Pencil-Management System

The pencils sit in the magnetic pencil cup on the board by the door. 

Before each class period is allowed to leave, I have a student count the pencils. No one leaves until all six pencils are back in the cup. 



Easy, peasy.  You can literally set this up and maintain it in under five minutes a day. 


What are your ideas for maintaining your pencils?  I'm always looking for upgrades!






Sunday, September 17, 2017

Teacher-Approved Shoes

Teacher shoes have to fulfill many criteria: Comfort, durability, professionalism, and reasonable price. Read my post to see the brands teachers recommend the most!

My personal favorite: Crocs Mary Jane. 


Teacher-Approved shoes for comfort, durability, and professionalism.





You can search Amazon for so many diffferent styles of crocs: 
boat shoes
ballet flats
wedges
loafers
heels

Most of them are indistinguishable from expensive brands of dress shoes and they provide the comfort I love in my crocs clogs. 


Other brands my teacher friends swear by:

Tieks
Sketchers
Sperry
Birkenstock
Vionic 
Dansko 
Clarks
Toms
Dr. Marten's


Do you own any of these brands?  Do you have any suggestions of brands that should be on the list?  I'd love to hear about them!




Sunday, September 10, 2017

Constitution Day Activities

Are you searching for meaningful activities for Constitution Day?  Would you like to be able to conduct your Constitution Day activities during multiple core subjects?  If you said yes, then this post is for you!

Constitution Day activities that can be done in Language Arts and Social Studies or Civics class.   Vocabulary graphic organizer for the Preamble to the Constitution.



I always like to try to combine my social studies curriculum with my language arts, and Constitution Day is no exception. Combining my Constitution activities during both subjects means I'm not confined to a single subject or block of time.

First, I like to make an anchor chart as a class of freedoms at home and school.  I keep it up for reference during the Constitution Day activities.  More on that later!
After making the anchor chart, we read a book I LOVE, We the Kids, to teach the preamble!  It's great for read-aloud or you can assign parts of it to older students to explore.


Constitution Day activities that can be done in Language Arts and Social Studies or Civics class.   Vocabulary graphic organizer for the Preamble to the Constitution.


Flipped Classroom idea:  There's also plenty of videos on YouTube of people reading the book. You could assign the video for homework the night/days before Constitution Day.  Then, students can come in and be ready to talk about it without a read-aloud.

After reading the book and/or watching the video, we revisit our anchor chart and put stars beside the freedoms that were also mentioned in the Preamble.  

Next, I like to explore the vocabulary of the Preamble because it is so challenging robust.  I love the language used, but most students don't have any background knowledge of words like "posterity".  To do this, I use a graphic organizer.

The first version of the organizer provides support with pictures and synonyms for the meaning of the Preamble vocabulary.


Constitution Day activities that can be done in Language Arts and Social Studies or Civics class.   Vocabulary graphic organizer for the Preamble to the Constitution.



The second organizer is a "challenge" for students who are ready to tackle synonyms and vocabulary independently.


Constitution Day activities that can be done in Language Arts and Social Studies or Civics class.   Vocabulary graphic organizer for the Preamble to the Constitution.


If you'd like to pick up a copy, click here.

Do you have Constitution Day activities or materials that make the day fun?  I'd love to hear about them!



Sunday, September 3, 2017

Grandparents Day Mini Writing Unit


Would you like to show some love to your grandparents this year?  Do you need to teach descriptive writing and poetry?  Read my post on how I combine the two!


I start out by reading some mentor texts aloud to the class that demonstrate how other kids describe their grandparent's and the experiences they share.  Some of my favorites:

Grandmother’s Book of Promises by Karen Hill


Grandparents Day Mini Writing Unit: Grandparent interview, descriptive writing, grandparent poem.




Grandpa's Face by Eloise Greenfield

Grandparents Day Mini Writing Unit: Grandparent interview, descriptive writing, grandparent poem.

I give several more mentor text suggestions in my Grandparent's Day Mini Writing Unit.

After reading the mentor texts, students interview their grandparents and use that information to write a poem in their honor.  


Grandparents Day Mini Writing Unit: Grandparent interview, descriptive writing, grandparent poem.



Grandparents Day Mini Writing Unit: Grandparent interview, descriptive writing, grandparent poem.



On Grandparent's Day, the students eat lunch with their grandparents and then read their poem to them.  It's really sweet.

My Grandparent's Day Mini Writing Unit includes:
Students will interview a grandparent through either calling, emailing, or visiting them. Students will use the answers from the interview to write a poem about their grandparent(s).

This packet includes:
~Mentor text suggestions for Grandparents Day
~Grandparent Interview letter
~Template for a “You Are” poem to honor grandparents.  In this poem, students use descriptive words and phrases to describe their grandparent(s).
~Differentiated lessons for students needing scaffolding and ready for a challenge

~Rubric


Do you celebrate Grandparent's Day at your school?  If so, what mentor texts do you use?  What activities do you do with the grandparents?  I'd love to hear about it!